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    • Username and other important upgrade information   09/23/2015

      Please note that the forum is still upgrading will be for most of the night I think,therefore you may find it slow at times, looking different etc etc. This will straighten out (he hopes) as the upgrade continues. One of the big changes is that usernames and display names will change.   At the moment you can have a username and display name for example you can have a username of joeblogsy and a display name of Joe Blogs.   After the upgrade we will only have usernames.   For some this won't make any difference at all but there are a fair few of you that have different display names., many of which I have changed for people for various reasons.   If, after the upgrade you notice your forum name isn't right please just send me a PM with your desired username.   You may also find you have been logged out, if this happens and you cannot remember your original forum details, please email me at mark@touringandtenting or open a support ticket by

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  1. All,

    I am currently a final year Mechanical Engineering student at the University of Bath and I am in the process of developing a DIY portable wind turbine made from your old washing machine.

    The Phoenix project came about as a result of the circular economy drive and focuses on reuse rather than recycle. I am trying to collect data from potential users in order to help formulate the final specifications for the product, the link to the survey I have prepared in order to help me collate this information can be found below:
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1FTxbVjQOecgG16KkDRjjcHylxqAKLZdw9zPaoMhAYMo/viewform

    I will be extremely grateful for any responses as the more people respond, the better I can understand the potential users of the product and therefore the better I can develop the product to meet these users needs.

    Regards,

    PhoenixBath
  2. All,

    I am currently a final year Mechanical Engineering student at the University of Bath and I am in the process of developing a DIY portable wind turbine made from your old washing machine.

    The Phoenix project came about as a result of the circular economy drive and focuses on reuse rather than recycle. I am trying to collect data from potential users in order to help formulate the final specifications for the product, the link to the survey I have prepared in order to help me collate this information can be found below:
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1FTxbVjQOecgG16KkDRjjcHylxqAKLZdw9zPaoMhAYMo/viewform

    I will be extremely grateful for any responses as the more people respond, the better I can understand the potential users of the product and therefore the better I can develop the product to meet these users needs.

    Regards,

    PhoenixBath
  3. All,

    I am currently a final year Mechanical Engineering student at the University of Bath and I am in the process of developing a DIY portable wind turbine made from your old washing machine.

    The Phoenix project came about as a result of the circular economy drive and focuses on reuse rather than recycle. I am trying to collect data from potential users in order to help formulate the final specifications for the product, the link to the survey I have prepared in order to help me collate this information can be found below:
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1FTxbVjQOecgG16KkDRjjcHylxqAKLZdw9zPaoMhAYMo/viewform

    I will be extremely grateful for any responses as the more people respond, the better I can understand the potential users of the product and therefore the better I can develop the product to meet these users needs.

    Regards,

    PhoenixBath
  4. Bailey of Bristol is proud to have worked closely with the Department of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Bath for many years to help develop the design and construction of its leisure vehicles with a view to optimising the towing performance of its caravans.

    The University of Bath has become widely regarded as the foremost independent authority in towing stability research, and Bailey used its latest scale model on its stand at The Caravan and Camping show to give live demonstrations of how a caravan's weight distribution is vital for safer towing - which many visitors described as "really useful" and "priceless".

    The model showed how a trailer's stability varied according to the location of heavier items, such as gas bottles or batteries. It demonstrated the importance of positioning heavier items near the middle of a caravan, as this proved to be the best weight distribution pattern for superior stability by improving the trailer's ability to recover from external forces affecting the control of the outfit, such as cross wind or buffeting from other road traffic.

    As a result of the research Bailey has made some key changes to the design and layout of its caravans to help make them inherently more stable and, as a result, safer on the road. This process began with the development of the Alu-Tech construction system which, with the absence of the heavy plastic cloaking panels found at the front and rear of conventionally built caravans, has a greater proportion of weight concentrated in the centre of the vehicle.

    More recently, this thought process was taken a stage further by moving gas bottle lockers and battery boxes to around the axle, which not only enhances stability but also has the added benefit of helping deliver lower caravan nose weights required for many of today's (and tomorrow's) lighter towcars.

    "We are really proud of the improvements we've made as a result of our partnership with the University of Bath. While there's been some great advances in towing stability devices in recent years, it would be wrong to rely on them, so we want to ensure our caravans are designed to give a superior, and safer, towing performance." said Nick Howard, Managing Director, Bailey of Bristol.

    "Of course, it is still essential for a caravan to be safely matched with an appropriate weight of towcar. Using a stability device is always a sensible precaution and gives added peace of mind, which is why they're available on all our caravans, but we hope they should only be needed in extreme circumstances," he continued.

    More details on The Caravan Club & Bailey sponsored research into trailer stability by the University of Bath please visit www.towingstabilitystudies.co.uk.



    Click here to view the article
  5. Bailey of Bristol is proud to have worked closely with the Department of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Bath for many years to help develop the design and construction of its leisure vehicles with a view to optimising the towing performance of its caravans.

    The University of Bath has become widely regarded as the foremost independent authority in towing stability research, and Bailey used its latest scale model on its stand at The Caravan and Camping show to give live demonstrations of how a caravan's weight distribution is vital for safer towing - which many visitors described as "really useful" and "priceless".

    The model showed how a trailer's stability varied according to the location of heavier items, such as gas bottles or batteries. It demonstrated the importance of positioning heavier items near the middle of a caravan, as this proved to be the best weight distribution pattern for superior stability by improving the trailer's ability to recover from external forces affecting the control of the outfit, such as cross wind or buffeting from other road traffic.

    As a result of the research Bailey has made some key changes to the design and layout of its caravans to help make them inherently more stable and, as a result, safer on the road. This process began with the development of the Alu-Tech construction system which, with the absence of the heavy plastic cloaking panels found at the front and rear of conventionally built caravans, has a greater proportion of weight concentrated in the centre of the vehicle.

    More recently, this thought process was taken a stage further by moving gas bottle lockers and battery boxes to around the axle, which not only enhances stability but also has the added benefit of helping deliver lower caravan nose weights required for many of today's (and tomorrow's) lighter towcars.

    "We are really proud of the improvements we've made as a result of our partnership with the University of Bath. While there's been some great advances in towing stability devices in recent years, it would be wrong to rely on them, so we want to ensure our caravans are designed to give a superior, and safer, towing performance." said Nick Howard, Managing Director, Bailey of Bristol.

    "Of course, it is still essential for a caravan to be safely matched with an appropriate weight of towcar. Using a stability device is always a sensible precaution and gives added peace of mind, which is why they're available on all our caravans, but we hope they should only be needed in extreme circumstances," he continued.

    More details on The Caravan Club & Bailey sponsored research into trailer stability by the University of Bath please visit www.towingstabilitystudies.co.uk.
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